Wednesday, June 13, 2018

"Murray Magpies" in the Garden


A common bird in Australia is the Magpie-lark  -  or as it is commonly called in South Australia, the Murray Magpie. We don't see a lot of them around our garden, probably as the Australian Magpies and the Grey Currawongs are more aggressive. In fact so rarely do we see them that I do not have any images of them.

 So it was with great pleasure and some excitement  that I discovered a nest in our oak tree last Spring and was able to snap the parents feeding the nestlings. They were well hidden and very protective , so the photo was taken from my veranda, a safe distance for all concerned.








We  watched them daily for a couple of weeks until the little ones were able to fly and then they were gone!!



We haven't seen them since, but we are hoping that they may return in Spring again.

Liz Needle

linking with

Wild Bird Wednesday

Nature Notes

Our World Tuesday

Tuesday, June 05, 2018

Grey Fantails



For several years we had Grey Fantails nesting in the garden and at the time I posted photos. Quite a while back now, so I will put some up again.









Then they disappeared and we didn't see them around - perhaps my camera scared them off!  This year, much to our delight w have had severaL sightings and although they are rather elusive and never keep still, I have been lucky enough to get some reasonable shots.




And my favourite shots of these pretty little birds.  The fellow with the brown colouring is a juvenile. Doesn't stop him flirting though.











Liz Needle

linking with

Our World Tuesday

 Nature Notes

Wild Bird Wednesday

Camera Critters

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Eastern Spinebill


One of my absolute favourites among our garden visitors is the pretty little Eastern Spinebill - Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris - a very long name for a shy little honeyeater. They are busy feeders, loving the native nectar flowers like grevillea and Epacris, but in our garden preferring the long tubular fuchsias and salvias.

We love watching them hanging upside down feeding from the drooping fuchsias or hovering like humming birds as they feed. In spring they become quite bold, collecting cobwebs from the eaves of our veranda just a couple of metres from where we sit.












Liz Needle

Linking with

Wild Bird Wednesday

Our World Tuesday

Monday, May 21, 2018

Colour in the Garden


At the moment there is not a lot of colour in the garden - autumn leaves were all but absent as we had that late dry, warm summer/autumn and no frosts to bring out the leaf colour. Very disappointing as I love the autumn color. Alas, the leaves just fell off the trees and we got the usual mess without the glorious colour. At least we are now getting the rain we needed.

But, we are getting colour in the garden as you can see from the photos. These beautiful birds are Rosellas. The one we get here in Adelaide is appropriately called the 'Adelaide Rosella' and is a subspecies of the Crimson Rosella from the Eastern states.

They come in a range of colours from yellowish to orange to red and all shades in between, which makes them far more interesting than the Crimson  Rosella. The young ones are born green and gradually get their colours as they mature.














Liz Needle

linking with

Our World Tuesday

Wild Bird Wednesday. If you pop over to this link you will find a great post on the Crimson Rosella.



Sunday, May 13, 2018

A Rare Sight

Although we have many birds in our garden, we don't always get a chance to photograph them, or to even get a good look at some of the shyer ones. It seems to me that every time I get my camera out, the birds disappear!!

Last week I had a couple of lucky sightings. Wattle birds are very common around here, but they usually stick to the trees and rarely come down close enough or for long enough to get a shot. I guess with not much water around, they are coming closer to get a drink, because I was able to not only get a good shot of the little Wattlebird (pretty common here), but also of the Red Wattlebird - far less common.

Little Wattlebirds - here the wattle is non-existent or very small, hence the "little".




Red Wattlebird - the wattle is much larger and more noticeable.




Tasmania has a Yellow Wattlebird, not found on the mainland. This one has a bright yellow belly and long fleshy yellow wattles. Wattlebirds are honeyeaters and are often quite aggressive towards smaller honeyeaters.

Linking with

Our World Tuesday
Wild Bird Wednesday


Liz Needle

Monday, May 07, 2018

Every Garden Needs a Birdbath


With the beautiful Autumn weather we have been enjoying (and some great rain), we have spent many pleasant hours sitting on the veranda enjoying the birdlife in the garden.  I have been doing a lot of hard gardening too, cleaning up the remains of summer in preparation for the Winter onslaught.

Installing birdbaths around the garden was the best idea and they are used regularly by most of the bird visitors, especially since we have had such a dry Summer and Autumn. Please enjoy these visits just as we have enjoyed them.

A communal bathing of Red-browed Finches.



Very shy and hard to catch a decent shot. A Yellow-faced Honeyeater.



A young Adelaide Rosella, just beginning to come into full colour.



A European Goldfinch drops in. These used to be very common here, but these days they are occasional visitors. Not an indigenous species, but pretty and very welcome to visit.



And one of my favourites. This pair of Silvereyes have been hanging around a lot lately. I hope they stay a while.


I am linking this page with

Our World Tuesday
Wild Bird Wednesday



Liz Needle







Saturday, April 14, 2018

At Last - Rain!!!

At last the Autumn rain has arrived - and none too soon. The garden is cheering - as am I. Very high winds in some parts have caused a lot of damage with fallen trees on power  lines and many thousands of home without electricity - but I am happy.

More garden visitors for you. This time it is the turn of the honeyeaters. Some, like the New Holland are very common and I have photos aplenty, but others are much more infrequent visitors - or at least seen more rarely and much more difficult to get any photos of, let alone good photos. I do apologise for the photo quality.

This New Holland Honeyeater likes to cuddle up to a tin flamingo in the garden.


While this bare branch on the flowering cherry has long been a favourite roosting spot for a variety of birds.


These fellows had a wonderful time in the bird bath one warm, dry evening.


This is a Yellow-faced Honeyeater - we see him around, but he is shy and I have rarely been able to snap him.





This year for the first time I have seen this one - a white-naped Honey eater. This fellow is a juvenile and is yet to get the characteristic black head of the mature bird. He is recognisable for the orange skin above his eye. We have seen a mature one, but as yet I have not been able to get a shot of him.





Liz Needle